Daylight saving time is ice time. We have created three ice cream recipes for you with something that is guaranteed to bring you through the hot summer days fresh!

 

1. Green tea basil cucumber

Ice tea ice cream recipe

You need:

Admittedly, cucumber may not be the best thing to think about when you thirst for a cool refreshment. Our aha moment was all the greater when we experimented with this recipe. For this ice tea we took a Japanese green tea, more precisely our Hon Gyokuro Kusanagi. A high-quality Sencha like our Kabuse Sencha is also ideal!

Let the tea be put in a litre of water in the fridge for 4 hours. This gives you a fresh cold infusion that tastes intense without tastebitter. The cucumber is now cut into fine slices and add. The deep, full-bodied character of the green teas is perfectly complemented by the sparkling light taste of the cucumber. Basil is horny one way or another, so off into the iced eat.

Add a few splashes of fresh lime juice to the brunch. If you like it a little sweeter, you can sweeten the tea a little with raw sugar or agave syrup. It’s a little different ice eater!

By the way: If you want to know more about Japanese green teas, we have a great article for you here!

2. Oolong Lime Elder

ice tea iistee friends of tea
Ice eae lime elderberry

We don’t want to try to put into words how incredibly delicious this ice eater is. So it’s best to convince yourself directly!

Everything you need:

You make a cold infusion out of the tea, in which you let the tea leaves in a litre of water for four to five hours, but even better overnight, in the fridge. When the tea is ready, squeeze out one or two limes (depending on how sour you like it) and add them to the tea. With 150 millilitres of elderflower syrup, it gives the ice tea the final stage of perfection. Finally, a small shrub mint in it, because it looks beautiful and because mint is the hammer!

If you like it even sweeter, raw sugar or agave syrup is recommended. Or more of the sweet elderflower syrup. Or both. #zuckerschock

3. Oolong Mango Mint

Ice tea recipes Friends of tea

The third ice tea in the waistband convinces me of a play of aromas of roasted and fruity flavours. Because even with delicious juices you can conjure up delicious iced tea!

Everything you need:

  • 10 g from our Dong Ding Oolong
  • Lots of mint!
  • Fresh mango juice (homemade for the ultimate DIY flair)
  • A splash of lemon juice
  • Optional: Some cane sugar or agave syrup

For this tea we have selected our Taiwanese Dong Ding Oolong. This was lightly roasted after production and thus has a delicate fruity and nutty character. Also with this ice tea we prepare the tea as a cold infusion. Put the tea leaves in your fridge with a litre of water for four to five hours, but preferably overnight.

Once the tea is ready, add some fresh mango juice. You then pack a lot of mint into the mixture of tea and mango juice. The more, the better. ­čśë Optionally some cane sugar or agave syrup for sweet, ready!

What is a cold infusion?

Tea is understood by many as a hot drink that can only be prepared hot. However, this does not necessarily have to be the case. Tea can also be poured cold. This cold infusion, or coldbrew, takes between four and eight hours to pull, depending on the tea. Bitter substances are only pulled out of the leaves in tea from a water temperature of 30-40 degrees. So the advantage of coldbrew is that you get an intense, full-bodied tea, which is hardly bitter. In addition, the tea is already cold, which makes it perfect for hot summer days or for further processing into iced tea!

In principle, you can pour any tea as coldbrew. As a rule of thumb, you should observe the following drawing times:

  • Japanese green teas: 4 hours
  • Black teas: 6-8 hours
  • Oolong Tees: 8 hours

 

Thirsty for ice eater?

In our online shop we have great teas from all over the world for you, who are just waiting to be processed by you into a delicious ice cream. Do you have any questions or suggestions for us? Let us know! We look forward to hearing from you.

 

This post is also available in: Deutsch (German)