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We often use analogies to help new tea drinkers discover tea as a new drink. We find it easier to understand traditional teas in a modern context such as third wave coffee, single Origin cocoa or local vegetables. Above all, however, the wine makes a good comparison: from the variety of grape varieties to the ageing process of certain bottles. For wine lovers with developed palate, tea offers a new (and alcohol-free) world of taste and knowledge that needs to be discovered. Here are five reasons why wine lovers should like tea!

Tea & Wine

Many wine drinkers enjoy the feeling of “time travel”, which results from the understanding of the origin of a bottle. The variety of grapes used and the way they are influenced by the soil and weather conditions during each harvest year are important factors for the final taste of each wine. The same applies to tea.

Origin and diversity play a major role in the aromas of tea and wine.

Many wine drinkers enjoy the feeling of “time travel”, which results from the understanding of the origin of a bottle. The variety of grapes used and the way they are influenced by the soil and weather conditions during each harvest year are important factors for the final taste of each wine. The same applies to tea.

Every regional craft tradition can offer a unique insight into the culture of the region. Be it the blend of Bordeaux or the roasting of charcoal in the Wuyi Mountains. Both wine and tea have greatly influenced the different regions in which they have become specialities. Just as regions such as Burgundy or champagne have become synonymous with their wines, many regions of China have gained an international reputation through their distinctive teestiles.

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Matcha tea for intense moments of enjoyment

Winemakers & Tea Manufacturers

Like winemakers, tea producers have to find the perfect manufacturing method through experience. Only in this way can they get the potentially best taste out of their leaves. Experts in both areas rely on regional traditions and personalized techniques to control and highlight the desired taste and textures in the mouth.

Craft traditions vary between traditional regions and produce a wide variety of teas.

Every regional craft tradition can offer a unique insight into the culture of the region. Be it the blend of Bordeaux or the roasting of charcoal in the Wuyi Mountains. Both wine and tea have greatly influenced the different regions in which they have become specialities. Just as regions such as Burgundy or champagne have become synonymous with their wines, many regions of China have gained an international reputation through their distinctive teestiles.

Subtlety and complexity

The trained palate of a wine lover is better prepared than most. Ideal conditions to recognize and appreciate the depth and complexity of the aromas in the world of tea. From soft and subtle to bold and complex, tea and wine have a similar taste spectrum with some obvious parallels. Lovers of refined white wines will probably enjoy the bright, clean taste of the early harvest of green or white teas. Those who prefer a smoky cabernet will be more comfortable with the flavor profiles of black teas.

Just as no two wines taste exactly the same, so teas have different taste profiles.

Of course, it is difficult to find complex and interesting flavors, as a well-known brand of tea bags to pick up at the local grocery store. As with mass wines, bag teas are homogenised mixtures of moderate harvests, with the emphasis on quantity and consistency. High-quality aromas can be searched here for a long time. These mediocre teas are refined with some milk and sugar. Similar to cheap wines that make great sangria.

Cup with Rooibos Tea

Food Pairing

With such obvious taste parallels, it’s an easy leap from wine pairing to tea pairing. In the course of the growing interest in high-quality teas, some restaurants have started to employ “tea sommeliers” who specialize in combining tea with different dishes. Although Chinese tea drinkers typically stick to the teas produced in their home regions, the variety of styles and flavors across China makes the combination options just as exciting as in wine.

Tea can be combined with food like wine to enhance the taste experience of the two

Tea can actually be associated with any kind of food. But the traditional kitchens of the tea-growing areas are best paired naturally with the locally produced teas. This can provide a good guide to getting started with tea making. In general, lighter teas such as green and white teas come from areas along china’s east coast, where seafood and vegetable dishes are staples. Inland, on the other hand, areas such as Yunnan Province are known for bold black teas and fermented pu-erhs that complement the rich, fatty proteins such as pork belly that are often eaten there.

The social component

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After all, there is no denying that one of the greatest pleasures in a bottle of wine comes from sharing with family or friends. Whether for celebration or just like that, drinking together offers the opportunity to have a chat and enjoy each other’s company. In China (and many other Asian cultures), tea often fulfills this role. In particular, the process of gong fu cha brewing is established as a social process and enjoys great popularity.